Students

Maria Delfina Bett
Roles
  • Story Development
Anecdote
On Wednesday 30 of June we went all together to spend the day at the farm. The idea was to show how the Argentine countryside works and to watch a polo practice. The activity took us a very short time so we all ended at the grass singing and dancing songs of our childhood, we had a lot fun.
Paula Bradley
Roles
  • Story Development
Anecdote
I had never been to a cumbia villera show before Yerba Brava. I knew the music, I danced to it in lots of parties, but I never participated. I have to say that the first night, as I waited for the band’s van to pick us up at the side of the highway, I just didn`t know what to expect. Truth be told, I found myself hanging out with a group of cool hardworking musicians and their managers, who received us as long time friends and took great care of us at all times. They let us into their worlds and I will always be thankful for that. I had the best time shooting in their shows and rehearsals, watching my partner MC as she literally climbed through the stage to take cool pictures and get them all "in action" Cumbia Villera is a relatively new expression that reflects the social issues taking place in the most marginal sectors of our society, and because of that, they are frowned upon and sometimes discriminated. I’ve met these guys and have nothing but respect for them and for what they do.
Melina Brea
Roles
  • Story Development
  • Multimedia Producer
Stories
  • Anecdote
    During the last month lots of funny, weird and unforgettable things happened, but there was something that surprised me a lot. After we have been walking by the capital city with Alexia, Alejandro and Gwen, after we had been rejected in the Teatro Colón and after we have been visiting the Recoleta cemetery, something that we did for fun because there wasn’t any story about that, we decided to have lunch. We needed something quick because we had to return urgently to the university. What was the only option? McDonalds, of course. Although it was obviously for us, the UCA team, the strange thing was Gwen didn’t want to eat there. The result was four people eating at the most famous fast food local of US: three argentines eating hamburgers with French fries and an American girl eating a salad.
    Alyssa Champion
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • Beyond the Market
  • Anecdote
    When I think about the hardest thing or the greatest experiences I had on this trip, I think it would have to be centered around perseverance. Before I came on this trip, I had a revelation during a beach trip that this experience would be like no other and it indeed it was. I was attacked by the devil several times. I had to start a new story, I got physically sick, (in which I pooped my pants, true story) and I lost my wallet. I was attacked emotionally, physically, and financially. But God is faithful and true and that was so evident in the outcome. I finished my second story in record time, I got over my sickness, and my wallet was restored to me after a couple called my parents in the United States trying to return it to me. God was using me for his glory, and all I had to do was persevere. Perseverance wasn’t easy but with the help of God, my family, my friends, and my coaches I made it with a giant smile on my face. I am so thankful that God trusted me enough to set obstacles in my way so that he could prefect me. “Consider it pure joy, my brothers, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith develops perseverance. Perseverance must finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything.” James 1:2-4
    Fernando de Dios
    Roles
    • Story Development
    Anecdote
    I have to admit, that Pato wouldn´t sound familiar either for most of local people. During the last weeks, I heard many times that "It is the national sport that almost nobody knows". Again, I have to admit that maybe that person should be right. But I can´t forget the reaction of my partner Brittany when he was explained by one of the players, why the game is called Pato. "Eh? With an alive duck???". I wish I have had a camera with me at that moment!
    Andrew Dye
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • Hope Against Hell
  • Anecdote
    Cristina Fletes
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • ¡Viva el Tango!
  • Anecdote
    Argentina was filled with many challenges for me. Tango, a topic for which nearly everyone has an opinion or preconceived notion, proved to be an extremely difficult topic to cover. I began work on several different angles until I was told to start completely anew. With only a week left of the project, it was a scramble to the finish. Many of us encountered setbacks and barriers, but the important thing was that everyone continued with their work and went on to produce something marvelous. I am glad that we all worked together to see this project through to the end. ¡Viva Argentina!
    María Agustina Girón
    Roles
    • Story Development
    Anecdote
    For over a month Catherine Orr and I have been working with artists about the underground theater's development on Buenos Aires. At first, I thought that this kind of story was going to be more relaxed in terms of production. But finally it ended up consuming an enormous amount of time and required us to appeal not only to our patience but also our best tactics of persuasion to achieve our goals. In spite of this, working on this story was something very valuable, and we really enjoyed doing it and it gave us many memorable anecdotes. An example of this, is what happened on our second visit to Pablo Mikozzi, actor and main character of our story: "Face to Face." After being advised that the artist was going to be very tired because of a trip, Catherine and I thought we wouldn´t achieve so much material that night. Mikozzi's face reflected a long weekend of work. "The truth is that when I saw you at the theatre with the cameras and all that stuff I wanted to die, I didn´t want to do anything that night," Pablo later admitted. However, despite the fatigue, Mikozzi invited us to the dressing room, where we could take some of the best photos of our project. A few minutes later we were in a men's restroom with an artist who was dressed as a jester and smoking sitting in a toilet stall, talking with about the magic of a show backstage. He was laughing and seemed to be very relaxed. Finally, he said: "I have a lot of fun, thank you for coming". Do not assume, just do. That's one of the things we learned in this month's work. The episode with Pablo Mikozzi it´s a very good example of that. The past month was long and hard work, no doubt. But it´s trace is much stronger than tiredness, than running against the clock and the few hours of sleep. We learned a lot working on this project, we achieved an excellent teamwork and remove all types of limits. After all, when you're worried about the job and runs, you may be surprised talking to a jester in a public restroom.
    Caitlyn Greene
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • To Say This Is Mine
  • Anecdote
    The well-manicured hands of my voiceover talent paced my subject's words as she read. "That is not life for my son," she practiced, syllable by syllable. "I want something better." The words were distant. The years of hard-lived experience that weathered my subject's own voice were missing. Hoping the dubbed version could come closer to the emotion of my subject's own voice, I pleaded, "from the heart," as she stepped into the sound booth. My voiceover talent sat in the booth, alone, facing nothing but the script of someone else's story and the challenge of embodying it herself. She came as close to being a cartonera as she probably ever will, and the change in her voice told me she felt a piece of María Julia's reality. I'm convinced those two women shared the next three minutes and 17 seconds.
    Hadley Gustafson
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • Infographics
    • Website Design & Programming
    • Infographics-team
    Anecdote
    Two of my favorite things about Buenos Aires are the people and the culture that is expressed on the streets and throughout. Most porteños (people of Buenos Aires) are welcoming, even to visitors struggling with castellano (Spanish). Partnering with the UCA faculty and students was essential symbiosis. I'm grateful too for the introduction to the all-night tango club, which seemed to be an amalgam: part youthful punk club, part contemporary art gallery, and part antique barn spotlighting authenticity and skill in the dance and music. Participating in fútbol (soccer) fever during the World Cup was phenomenal, whether by watching the match on television in a San Telmo, Recoleta or Palermo neighborhood cafe, pizza shop or bakery; being immersed in a massive crowd of ecstatic celebrants at El Obelisco; or photographing young boys enthusiastically living and breathing the sport on the street in the sunshine. The streets of Buenos Aires are a pastiche as well: the grandeur and patina of the old architecture reminds of past decadence, while the colorful omnipresent graffiti voices resistance and passion. http://www.hadleygdesign.com/
    Alexia Verónica Gutiérrez
    Roles
    • Infographics
    Anecdote
    When studying a new language you have to memorize a lot of terms, rules and correct forms to express, to succeed in communicating with the others. However, sometimes you lose the funniest and more profitable things. During this month I had the chance to learn, among other things, a bit more of English every day. In a lunch with Gwen, she taught me that when you ask for condiments for the salad you have to say “salad dressing”. It would be like you dress the salad. I also learned that in photography the sunset it’s called “the magic hour”. And with an invitation to a trip, I learn the saying “the more, the merrier”.
    Hernán Herrera
    Roles
    • Story Development
    Anecdote
    I remember starting this project filled with anxiety, nervousness, and worried about what we might find on the way. All those feelings washed away when i finally met with UNC staff, a group of excellent, working, comprehensive, happy and funny people. I remember having to go through a personal crisis and the support and understanding that the whole staff of this project gave me, UCA and UNC alike. I felt they were really worried about me, which made me feel very much appreciated. That was a turning point for me in this project. I remember being surprised with the skill that UNC staff came with, and even more with how they combined with our coaches from UCA made, at least me, find out some skills I didn't even know I had. Thank you all very much to both teams, I will really miss you all, and those times. I remember long talks with Martin Pastor and Cecilia Balbín, laughter with Christian Doyle and Charles Floyd, a crazy bohemian tango night with Christina and Rob, and the long meetings with the students from both universities. I remember the last night together, the dinner we all shared, the after dinner party, and i remember not remembering were I left the car after leaving the party, i had to take a cab. I thank you all so very much, and I hope we meet again, in North Carolina, Buenos Aires or wherever the roads take us. My best wishes, Hernán Herrera
    Gisele Laffont
    Roles
    • Story Development
    Anecdote
    I entered the guitar workshop at La Juanita, carrying my sound recording equipment and willing to listen to some music from the 30 students. However, towards the end of the lesson, Carlos, the teacher, introduced me to his students as "a visitor who came to listen to you and that also happens to be a singer". "Singer?", I said, surprised. The kids were staring at me, waiting for me to start singing something...and all I could do was think of excuses not to make a fool of myself! Carlos asked me if I knew the song "Zamba para olvidar", and I told him that not quite, but than I wouldn't sing anyhow. Suddenly, a seven-year-old came up to me, running, holding his notebook opened on the page where he had the lyrics to that song and asked me to sing. I couldn't resist his gesture. That day, I had no choice but to be a singer for them.
    Julieta Berenice De Laurentiis
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • Infographics
    • Infographics-team
    Anecdote
    Gabriela Natalia Rosas Maruyama
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • Multimedia Producer
    • Infographics-team
    Stories
  • Beyond the Market
  • Anecdote
    When it's time to sum up what I learned from this project, I think I have a positive conclusion after all. I have a lot of anecdotes: my partner's sickness, discussions late at night about how we would continue with our stories, the asado that we ate with the gauchos of Mercado de Liniers. But I won't tell those stories, I'll tell my story. When I applied for this project, a lot of things came across my mind and I thought that this experience would make me grow up not only personally but also professionally. In addition to that, the subject of the documentary was very interesting too. Taking into consideration that we were a heterogeneous group and that it was more likely to find differences than similarities, I decided to accept the challenge, knowing that this would probably be an unforgettable experience. And it was indeed. I learned that with patience, conviction and, mainly, tolerance you can play your role correctly although sometimes there are barriers and obstacles inside and outside the group. I believe the key is there. Even though it's very important, it's not only a matter of who can take the best photo but how you play your role or how much creative you are playing that role. And I think that teamwork is base on that, not only making yourself shine but trying to achieve the same goals that your team has, a positive collaboration and help everyone shine. And, in this opportunity, I guess everyone had it. Beyond the miseries or what was left by the crisis, I found strength and desire to move on in all the stories that were involved even though it was hard (and I'm not just talking about the stories portrayed). We made a lot of sacrifices but I consider that the rewards will be greater. What an experience ladies and gentlemen! Beyond the technicalities, the differences, the cultures or the economies, I think is a priceless to have the feeling that the actors of your story invite you to be part of their stories. I believe that creating this bound with that people allow them to trust us so they can open their houses and share their activities, their customs, their lives, even for a while, with us. That is a privilege that we, as future journalists, can actually enjoy.
    Kaitlin McKeown
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • Until We Are Heard
  • Anecdote
    I think I wanted a challenge when I came here. I was just dipping my toes in a different world, but I knew I wanted to tell a story that meant something to these people. The story, of the piquetero movement, I found both alluring and intimidating—an essential piece of Argentine identity. I rolled into the project with unknowing momentum, anticipating a situation different than I had ever covered before. I remember distinctly at the end of our first meeting, a fellow photographer relayed a word of advice—“You’re going where? Don’t take out your camera if you don’t want to get killed.” I had no idea what in the world I had gotten myself into. I went off on my first day of shooting with skepticism blaring through my head. But after sharing some stories and a lot of mate, the conversation eased. I began to see that my perceptions of this place only skimmed the surface. After a month of working on this project, I keep coming back to this realization—that people are people, wherever you are.
    Amanda Michelson
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    • Infographics
    • Website Design & Programming
    Stories
  • Anecdote
    As the sea of blue and white engulfed the pinnacle of the city, I knew then that soccer was so much more than a sport. Thousands of people who rushed to the nation's monument, the Obelisk, were dressed in the country's uniform: soccer jerseys. The surrounding roads had throngs of fans covered in Argentine flags blocking off 20 lanes of traffic. As an onlooker to this victorious craze, I was greeted with hugs and cheers from strangers celebrating Argentina's recent win. For this moment in time, the struggles and woes within the country were forgotten, and a united front triggered a new identity that I had yet to experience. There was an understood connection between each person around me. It was an endearing experience because I felt a part of something greater. I was considered no longer an onlooker but a contributing part of the Argentine victory. How is it capable that for 90 minutes the entire city has banded together to watch their fellow man play? Only a true love for the sport can make this possible, and that is an experience I would never want to forget.
    María Cecilia Mira
    Roles
    • Story Development
    Anecdote
    The bad thing about this profession is that people see a finished product. There are no excuses. It is what it is. I think that’s what makes it so hard. Trying to sum up 3 weeks in a few words or a few minutes of video is not only difficult but a little bit unfair. It’s a little bit sad to know that no one but us is going to go through the long nights of editing. Or the meetings where we received a little scold. Or simply walking through the city with your partner talking about nothing and everything. The bond that you form with your partner and your subject is a really hard thing to explain. Our goal was never to use our subject’s story, Marta. We wanted to tell it. And to tell it, first we had to feel it, for other people to feel it. We met with her many times; sometimes we didn’t take the camera and just invested time in knowing her better. Such a sweet and genuinely good woman who always brought us a candy. She had her birthday while the project was going on and we didn’t even doubt about getting her a present which she wore the very next time we met with her. She even sent a jar of dulce de leche to my partner. I think that those little things are what make this profession worthwhile. I met people that wouldn’t have met any other way and I can’t feel anything but thankful and blessed for every little moment I shared with them.
    Bethany Nuechterlein
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    • Website Design & Programming
    • Infographics-team
    Stories
  • Anecdote
    I ate more ham and cheese sandwiches during my stay in Buenos Aires than I had my whole life prior to the trip.
    Catherine Orr
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • Face to Face
  • Anecdote
    I think Agustina and I both learned that sometimes you have to trust that your subject trusts you. One night, Pablo was coming straight to the theater from the airport and his flight was late. Everyone at the theater warned us that he was going to be very tired and that we should just stay out of the way and not bother him. We were both incredibly worried that he was going to cancel. But when Pablo arrived, tired and a little frazzled, he gave us each a quick kiss on the cheek and told us to come on back. Ten minutes later we were standing in the bathroom watching him take his pre-show smoke break, in full jester costume. What a moment to have a camera!
    María Florencia Otero
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • Anecdote
    Sitting in front of my former president, in the midst of the most important interview of my life, I saw a country that did not know how to handle the situation from the outset. In December 2001, when the sun could not be plugged with a finger, instead of taking responsibility for each part that we played, we prefered to blame the other. On the one hand, presidents who having made wrong decisions blamed their predecessors and their opponents. On the other hand, a people noticing the seriousness of the matter, chose to make the government responsible for what was happening. Argentines now look back at our history with a bitter taste in the mouth, not able to recognize what we did and what we did not. And I now understand and appreciate the privilege I had. At my 20 years, I understand more what happened in my country almost ten years ago, in a way that is not taught in history books.
    Mary Catherine Penn
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • Liberated Art
  • Anecdote
    The graffiti artists we interviewed snuck us into the trendy pre-artist-champagne-fest of the big contemporary art festival, arteBA. We had to sit around back in an alley while a confused guard looked at us, probably thinking we were waiting on a drug deal. Finally, Leandro (Tec) came out to give us illicit name tags. Mine said my name was "Pedro" and we had to pretend that it was a feminine name in the States. We breezed through security, but when the last guard checked my tag, he gave me a knowing look.
    Brittany Peterson
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • A Gentleman’s Sport
  • The Happiness They Have
  • Anecdote
    On my third Sunday photographing the young Catholic missionaries in the Villa 21, I snapped one of my favorite pictures of a young boy with milk running down his chin after breakfast. My photography coach and I loved the photo and decided it had to go in my video. The next week, he returned with me to take a panorama photo. As breakfast began, we heard a voice from below us and looked down to see the boy from the photo with a drop of milk clinging to his chin, as if it had been hanging out there the whole week.
    Magdalena Tezanos Pinto
    Roles
    • Story Development
    Anecdote
    I might seem a little cowardly or just polite but pitifully those funny anecdotes that I now remember are not appropriate to be told here, but I can say they made me laugh a lot! The experience was great in a personal and a professional way. It required a lot of effort, but I can assure they will give their fruits.
    Amanda Price
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    • Website Design & Programming
    Stories
  • The Dog Walker
  • Anecdote
    So there we are, me and my UCA partner, Alejandro, standing on a street corner, searching frantically in all directions. We are looking for tongues hanging out and listening for toenails clicking on the stone sidewalk. Our task that morning was to hunt down a dog walker in Buenos Aires, and we were sure we could find one until we arrived at the deserted dog park. We were about to find the nearest bus stop when, across the park and on the other side of a four-lane highway, we spot a mess of leashes and wagging tails, rocketing through the streets away from us. We threw our heavy gear over our shoulders and ran in pursuit, dodging traffic and strollers and business men carrying hot coffees. We lost him and stood on that street corner, turning in all directions, disappointed. Suddenly, we see a vision in bright red sweatpants and 15 furry minions on colorful leashes, gliding through the crowded streets in our direction.
    Alejandro Puricelli
    Roles
    • Story Development
    Anecdote
    As I worked full-time with the University of North Carolina team, I inevitably shared many meals with them. And when it was dinner time and they all wanted Chinese, they would ask ME if I could call a Chinese restaurant for delivery because I was the only Argentinian around and the only one who spoke Spanish fluently. The first time I opened the menu to help them order, I was really surprised...HELLO! IT WAS ALL IN CHINESE! So, to recap: the Americans were asking an Argentinian if he could speak Chinese for them. That was a challenge for me haha. Gwendolyn Saunders, Amanda Michelson, Amanda Price and Katherine Vance: thanks for spending a lot of afternoons and evenings with me and all that Chinese food. Thanks to everyone on the UNC and UCA teams.
    Florencia Renda
    Roles
    • Story Development
    Anecdote
    I received my first chocolate to celebrate the sweetness week from the paco addict in rehab. He offered it to me, while he was waiting to exchange a kiss on his cheek, but instead I hugged him. He was confused. First, he remained still, but then hugged me back. Throughout the entire project, these kids taught me that all preconceptions are nonsense. They do live in an underworld, but many of them are trying to find a way out, and this is the reason why people shouldn’t be afraid of them. While I was doing this story, I came across a reality that I previously ignored, and never understood. I’m exceedingly happy I had the chance to approach to those who suffer and understand better their struggle. I’m not the same person I was a month ago.
    Sarah Riazati
    Roles
    • Website Design & Programming
    Anecdote
    María Agustina Rodríguez
    Roles
    • Story Development
    Anecdote
    When Caitlyn and I went to a villa in Retiro to interview the president of El Ceibo cooperative Caitlyn saw a police helicopter and wanted to get on in order to take some good pictures, I just looked at her and smile waiting her to tell me it was a joke...but she kept telling me to go to a police station and asked them to go with them! It was very funny because I really had to convinced her that it was impossible for us to go there!! She's definitely the most adventurous partner I've ever had!
    Noël Salviolo
    Roles
    • Story Development
    Anecdote
    Gwen Saunders
    Roles
    • Infographics
    • Website Design & Programming
    • Infographics-team
    Anecdote
    As a graphic artist, I didn't have the same experience as the photojournalists with finding or developing a video story, so my connection to Argentina was different. I kept comparing the experience to my semester abroad in Florence, Italy, and I really struggled to achieve the same sense of belonging in Buenos Aires. Though I couldn't speak Spanish fluently, find my way around the city, or even remotely understand many aspects of the culture, I realized that my new-found Argentinian friends were my connection to the country. Alexia, Melina and Alejandro took me all over Buenos Aires, from McDonald’s to El Caminito. Flor took me home to her loving family in Rio Cuarto, where they fed and pampered me so much that I didn’t want to leave. And then Yamil showed me Córdoba – in only one day! Despite all that I learned academically on this trip, my memories with my friends are what made the experience so worthwhile. Now I just need to get them all to come visit the U.S.!
    Daniel Sircar
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • Dream in Progress
  • Anecdote
    So on my last day of shooting, Toty had me over for a delicious asado at his house, and I decided to shoulder the camera for most of day and just enjoyed myself, shooting pictures here and there (On a side note, I made some of my favorite frames that day, when I was simply having fun). Well, in the middle of dinner, we're all laughing and clinking glasses and talking around the table, and I had one of those moments where you just stop, and I think, "Wait. I'm at an Argentinian congressman's house, munching on some food I don't know how to pronounce in some neighborhood that I'd never heard of a month ago, and I feel like I'm amongst family. HOW did I get here?" It's thanks to so many how I did, and I hope I never stop asking that question as I continue to grow as a person and explore as a photographer.
    Katherine Vance
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • For Alberto
  • Anecdote
    Despite taking a few classes, my spanish is not as good as I thought, and Marta, the subject of our story, spoke no english. So, when my UCA partner, Ceci couldn't go with me to accompany Marta to the cemetery, I was nervous that it would be uncomfortable for Marta. She seemed to enjoy talking to us, but she and I had never truly had a one on one experience. Yet, it wasn't awkward at all. In fact, it was perhaps the most memorable moment of my time here. Marta and I walked to the cemetery together, visited her husband's grave, and walked back with very little said-- but I felt as though we were communicating in our silence. I do not understand what Marta has been through, but her personal tragedy and the beauty with which she now lives her life is inspiring. Marta trusted us with something very personal, and that brought Marta, Ceci and I together in a way that I had not expected. I realized that day at the cemetery that a mutual affection had grown between us over the few weeks I had known her, and that the affection went beyond words. We walked back to her house in near silence, making a stop at a store for her to pick something up. At her house, I realized that she had bought cookies for me. I can not do justice to the moment with words… eating cookies and drinking coffee with Marta, laughing at our attempts to have a conversation; a silent bond that I will always appreciate.
    Margaret Cheatham Williams
    Roles
    • Multimedia Producer
    Stories
  • Another Vibe
  • Anecdote
    My trip began with a story assignment that quickly became an adventure… After my first meeting with the band I was invited to spend the weekend with them on tour in Sante Fe, another province of Argentina. Rob and I joined them for an epic 16-hour road trip, six venues in one night, and one very sleepy morning. We hardly spoke any Spanish, and it was a definite lesson in communication! This has been a challenging, unique and overall amazing experience! I was extremely fortunate to land on this story and to have the opportunity to spend the month with incredible people. I cannot thank the Gastón, the band, Paula, Rob, and the group enough!

    Faculty

    Cecilia Balbin
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • UCA Faculty and Staff
    • Associate Producer
    Anecdote
    After the first screening of the interviews filmed by our students, I felt disappointed and concerned. It was sad to think that our current history could be summarized only by images of poverty, demonstrations, violence and marginalization. Beyond this painful and undeniable reality, as well as the colorful postcards brought by tango and soccer that seem to define our identity in front of strangers, there is a tradition of values and willingness to overcome challenges that radiates in our warmth, creativity and cultural and intellectual vitality. I imagined what would say the parents of the American students comparing this visit to their previous production when they toured the idyllic Galapagos´ sites! Then, at the final screening, I was glad and proud to realize how this life experience enriched and transformed them as individuals through the bonds forged with their teammates and those who generously shared their stories with them.
    Eduardo Blake
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • UCA Faculty and Staff
    Anecdote
    I think that what I will remember in years to come are the really weird hours we had to work for this project. Will I miss the rush of adrenaline, the feeling of always being on a deadline, always running, always behind the schedule, with some last minute change popping up and altering everything? Surely yes! I particularly cherished the bonding over phone calls on a Saturday morning from students asking for guidance, support or just a cathartic conversation. But if I have to remember one particular moment, I think it will be how the exhaustion painted in our faces (students & faculty), after weeks of hard work, transformed into happiness (and a little relief) when we finally saw what we had created together. It was a lovely moment that will always be with me.
    Pat Davison
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • Project Coach
    • Website Design & Programming
    • Executive Producer
    • Multimedia Coach
    Stories
  • Passion
  • Until We Are Heard
  • Face to Face
  • Hope Against Hell
  • A Gentleman’s Sport
  • Anecdote
    The end of the project arrived, and everyone was exhausted but excited. The buzz in the auditorium was palpable as a capacity crowd filtered off after our screening. For me, the project was nearly a year in the making, from the inception of an idea to this moment. This was the payoff. As our team gathered for the final debriefing, I scanned the room and watched the students, happy, together and bonded. I felt their excitement as they strengthened ties that bridged cultures and would last a lifetime. It wasn’t always so sublime, I remembered. We faced sickness, theft, language barriers, access problems and personality conflicts. We wrestled with every type of digital media, and every team member pushed personal limits. Halfway through, I asked myself if it was all worth it. Of course it was. The anecdotes recorded here reflect the universe of learning that has been opened to all of us. Together with our UCA friends, we are so grateful for the privilege of sharing the lives of the Argentine people and for the honor of bringing a piece of their story to the world on this website.
    Donald Desloge
    Roles
    • Website Design & Programming
    • Web Developer Coach
    Anecdote
    Always have a good joke on hand. It may come in handy.
    Christian Doyle
    Roles
    • UCA Faculty and Staff
    • Website Design & Programming
    • Design & Infographics Coach
    Anecdote
    Charles Floyd
    Roles
    • Infographics
    • Website Design & Programming
    • Infographics-team
    • Design & Infographics Coach
    Anecdote
    Donny Lofland
    Roles
    • Project Coach
    • Website Design & Programming
    • Web Developer Coach
    Anecdote
    Football (aka soccer) is a life unto itself in Argentina. As we approached game time for each 2010 World Cup game that Argentina played in, the city grew quiet, the streets emptied and for a brief period, time slowed down. The transformation was amazing - something you'd expect to see in a movie - not real life. I watched each game sitting in our apartment in San Telmo with the balcony door open. There was almost complete silence during the games as the city held its breath until a score or major play when suddenly the silence was broken as the city screamed out in a deafening roar of voices, horns, and noise in the streets ... only to silence again within minutes. It was like sitting listening to music on the quietest setting, then periodically spiking the volume up to maximum, then right back down to zero. As each games wrapped up, the city took a breath and all the usual noises of life quickly returned as though nothing had happened. It was truly an amazing experience.
    Martín Pastor
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • Infographics
    • UCA Faculty and Staff
    Anecdote
    I have the feeling of been part of all stories, maybe because if anyone had any questions or need, you came to me thinking that I had all the answers. Let me tell you the truth, it wasn’t that way, but it was essential to give students a safe and reliable response. That made them more confident about yourselves their work. I'm glad for it and I think the results are evident in this work. Dubbing is a story apart. Congratulations to both teams UNC and UCA, it has been a great pleasure working with all of you.
    Rob Rone
    Roles
    • Project Coach
    • Multimedia Coach
    Stories
  • The Dog Walker
  • To Say This Is Mine
  • Another Vibe
  • Dream in Progress
  • ¡Viva el Tango!
  • Anecdote
    For about twenty minutes, when Chris and I first arrived at our assigned destination on Estados Unidos street in San Telmo, there was nothing to do. We stood and wondered about whether or not the taxi driver really knew where we were supposed to be when he sped off. We pressed various buttons on the door, eliciting various greetings and nonsensical responses on our part in Spanish. We watched old men walk by in their always dapper outfits. I felt very American in my cargo shorts - especially so because it was a very brisk winter morning where I found myself in the southern hemisphere. I put blue jeans on top of them and went to talk to a young man across the street who apparently had only one phrase in English, "No English." I talked to him anyways. He laughed.
    Chris Sinclair
    Roles
    • Project Coach
    • Multimedia Coach
    Stories
  • The Breaking Point
  • Beyond the Market
  • Liberated Art
  • For Alberto
  • The Happiness They Have
  • Anecdote
    The apartments we stayed in were scattered throughout a neighborhood. The sidewalk routes between apartments became a coach's highway. The memories logged as we gathered in small groups, stayed up late editing, talking through a range of topics, from life issues to assignment issues, under shaded porches or over dining room tables, became our story. And I think, as we approached the end of our time together, the story we lived was one we wouldn't have traded for any other.
    Juan Pablo Tramezzani
    Roles
    • Story Development
    • UCA Faculty and Staff
    Anecdote
    This experience was unique: the classroom became an amazing idea gnerator, there were no schedules, and there were no weekends. To think up a story and be able to tell it in a short time was a challenge that strengthened our students' journalistic formation. There were no more UNC or UCA students, there was only a third language that wasn't either spanish or english, it was a multimedia language, that felt almost universal, like the language of music or love, because the final product is there and it is a reality. In these times of globalization there weren't frontiers between us, there was sinergy in enjoying the wonderful stories that, in just a few minutes, our journalists in progress knew how, wanted to were able to show us. Congratulations.